Virtual pelagic trip: Perpetua Bank

This is a virtual pelagic trip made up from several trips from Newport, Oregon in 2003, and a few other selected photos from our trips.


Above: Guide David Mandell explains the day's plans during a brief orientation before getting on the boat. Photo by Greg Gillson, March 1, 2003.


Above: Surfrider, our ride to Perpetua Bank from about 2000-2003. Photo by Greg Gillson, July 5, 2003.


Above: California Sea Lion bachelors loaf on the docks at Newport. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Above: A beautiful morning as we motor slowly out the marina and into the main channel. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Above: Pelagic Cormorant is one of three cormorants we usually identify in Yaquina Bay. Photo by Tim Shelmerdine.


Above: Guide Tom Snetsinger points out birds on the jetties. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Above: We spend a few minutes near shore on most trips in order to find several birds and marine mammals we might not otherwise encounter. Marbled Murrelets are one of the species we look for near shore. Photo by Tim Shelmerdine.


Above: Yaquina Head seabird colony and lighthouse. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Above: Common Murres bring fish to feed their young at the Yaquina Head seabird colony. Photo by Tim Shelmerdine.


Above: We head offshore and leave behind the many common nearshore birds. Soon we spot our first shearwater of the day, gliding over the waves. Will we see more? Photo by Greg Gillson, July 5, 2003.


Above: Guide Tom Snetsinger tosses popcorn to keep a trail of gulls and other seabirds following us all day. Photo by Greg Gillson, January 2, 2005.


Above: A Cassin's Auklet flees from in front of our boat. Photo by Wink Gross.


Above: We encounter a strange Ocean Sunfish. Photo by Greg Gillson.


Above: About 20 miles offshore we spot a rare Laysan Albatross among a flock of Sooty Shearwaters. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Above: Black-legged Kittiwake. Photo by Steve Shunk.


Above: We stop and chum, bringing in Black-footed Albatrosses to beg popcorn, beef fat, and fish scraps. Photo by Greg Gillson, July 5, 2003.


Above: Don't forget the gulls! Western, Glaucous-winged, Herring, and Thayer's (top right) flank the albatrosses. Photo by Greg Gillson, March 1, 2003.


Above: A Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel is attracted to our chum slick. Photo by Tim Shelmerdine.


Moving about 30 miles offshore, just west of Perpetua Bank, we encounter mid-water trawlers and the processing ship Ocean Rover, with a cloud of birds behind. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 20, 2003.


Happy birders. A good day becomes a great day when we encounter active fishing vessels. Photo by Greg Gillson, May 31, 2003.


A swarm of seabirds feed behind a fishing vessel. These are part of the 261 Black-footed Albatrosses, 1081 Pink-footed Shearwaters, and 7292 Sooty Shearwaters seen this day. We also spotted a Flesh-footed Shearwater in this riot. Do you? Photo by Greg Gillson, May 31, 2003.


When the nets spill and the Pacific Whiting dumps into the water, gorged seabirds are the result. How can one photo convey the activity--the squeals and moans and shrieks, the flapping and splashing, the diving and threatening and pattering and chasing? Photo by Greg Gillson, July 5, 2003.


Above: South Polar Skuas are attracted to feeding flocks of shearwaters. Photo by Troy Guy.


Above: A Tufted Puffin during a quieter moment. Photo by Greg Gillson, July 5, 2003.


Above: Risso's Dolphins! Photo by Wayne Hoffman.


Above: Long-tailed Jaegers are mostly found far offshore. Photo by Steve Shunk.


Above: Returning to port. David Mandell reflects on the day behind him and the meaning of life. Well, okay, maybe he's just feeding the gulls. Photo by Greg Gillson, March 1, 2003.

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