Oregon Breeding Bird Atlas
Frequently asked questions

What are the system requirements for using the Atlas?

A CD drive.

An internet browser such as Netscape Navigator or Internet Explorer. The browser must be of version 4 or higher.

What are the system recommendations for running the Atlas?

Color monitor, maximum color depth you have, at least 16 bit. With only 256 colors, many photographs in the Atlas will not look good.

For best effects, maximize the screen space for the Atlas by turning off or minizing the toolbars in the browser. Use menus or key combinations instead of the buttons in the toolbars. (Alt-left arrow for the Back button). You can gain 30% more screen space for the Atlas by hiding the toolbars (in Netscape: View menu; Show options. In Explorer: View menu; Toolbars).

How do I tell what version of the browser I have.

In the browser, under the Help menu, there is an "About ..." option (i.e. "About Navigator" or "About Internet Explorer".)

How do I open the Atlas on my computer?

On Windows, the Atlas CD should start up automatically in your browser. If it does not, use one of these two ways:

1) Navigate to the CD (on Windows click on the Start button, then Windows Explorer and locate the CD labeled Atlas (frequently the D: drive) and double-click on the ATLAS.HTM icon. That should launch your favorite browser.

2) Launch your browser. Then from the File menu, select Open or Open Page. Use the Browse button to navigate to the CD and select the ATLAS.HTM.

Once you have started the Atlas the first time, set a bookmark to the title page (Netscape), or add the Atlas to Favorites (Internet Explorer). Use the bookmark (or favorites) to open the Atlas.

Do I need to be connected to the internet to run the Atlas?

No, you do not need to be connected to the internet. You need a browser, but the Atlas does not require an internet connection or a modem.

I don't have an internet browser. How do I obtain one?

If you have access to the Web, you may download a copy of the Netscape browser from http://home.netscape.com/ or the Microsoft browser from http://microsoft.com/windows/ie. These will be large files and may take time to download. You may also order the browser on a CD through either of these sites.

Does the Atlas have a Help menu?

The Atlas Help icon is the big question mark icon near the top left of the window. Also, a list of the Help screens can be found in the Introduction section.

What is my best way to get to know the Atlas?

When you first launch the Atlas, click on the Help icon (the big question mark). It gives a quick overview of the Atlas. Then explore the different buttons along the top of the window, especially the Intro, Species, Hex. Use the Help icon (the big question mark) frequently.

When I click on the Help icon, nothing happens?

The Help window is probably already open and hidden behind other windows. Click on browser's icon on your task bar to view it again.

What about Back and Forward buttons? Sometimes they work; sometimes they don't!

There are places in the Atlas where the Back and Forward buttons do not work. Use the Atlas icons and the links within the Atlas frames to navigate when the buttons do not get you there.

How can I compare two species? How can I look at two birds at the same time?

Use the browser File menu/New window option to open a second brower window and navigate to open the Atlas. Or double-click on the ATLAS.HTM icon on the CD.

How do I use the data files?

Most of the data files are text files, with a TXT extension. You may open these files with a program like a spreadsheet, data base, or word processor. You find the data files in the DATA folder on the Atlas CD. You will have to provide your own column headers, as given in the Atlas CD under the "Data files" section of the Introduction.

How can I find?

...a list of species that are likely to breed in Oregon?

Click on the Species icon at the top of the Atlas window.

... a list of species that occur in a specified area during the breeding season?

Click on Hex icon at top of screen, click on a hexagon of interest from the map, click on "Field observations" in the menu on the upper left.

... a list of species not found by the atlas project in a particular area, but which deserve more searching?

Click on Hex icon at top of screen, click on a hexagon of interest from the map, click on "Species predicted but not found" in the menu on the upper left.

... a list of species found in a specific type of habitat?

Click on Habitat icon at top of screen, click on a habitat type of interest, click on "Species Association" in the menu on the upper left.

... a list of habitat types where a particular species is most likely to be found during the breeding season?

Click on Species icon at top of screen, click on the species of interest. Habitats with which the species is associated to varying degrees are listed.

... a map showing locations of habitats where a particular species is most likely to occur during the breeding season?

Click on Species icon at top of screen, click on the species of interest. Habitats with which the species is associated are mapped at several different resolutions.

... the ID number of a hexagon, when all I know is its approximate location?

Click on Hex icon at top of screen, click on a hexagon of interest from the map to see an enlarged view with many geographic names given. If this does not appear, click on Hexagon map in the menu in the upper left.

... the ID number of a hexagon, when all I know is the name of a place or a township, range, and section.

You will need to use a program like a spreadsheet, word processor, or data base to open the appropriate file in the Data folder on the Atlas CD. Search the "Geographic names" (ALLPLACE.TXT) or the "Township range section" (TRS.TXT) as appropriate. These are considered text files, usually an option in programs Open command.

... what dates constitute the "breeding season" of a particular species in Oregon?

Click on Species icon at top of screen, click on the species of interest. A graph showing distribution of reported breeding dates is on the left side of the page. To see the exact dates, click on "Obs" in the upper left, and you will see a screen with the reported dates with associated atlas unit and observer.

... who made a particular species observation shown on a speciesí range map, and when they saw it?

Click on Species icon at top of screen, click on the species of interest, then click on "Obs" in the upper left, and you will see a screen listing the observer(s) who reported the species from the atlas unit, and sometimes the year and date. Note that many redundant records have been dropped from the database.

... definitions of the breeding codes?

Click on the Methods or Intro icon at top of screen, click on "Evidence of Breeding" under Contents in the left margin.

What should I do if I saw a species in a place not shown on the map?

Click on the Future icon at the top of page. That section talks about using new information and gives instructions at the bottom of the page that appears.

Who should I notify if I find factual errors in the bird data?

Please contact:

Paul Adamus, email: adamus7@attbi.com
6028 NW Burgundy Dr., Corvallis, OR 97330

or

Kit Larsen, email: kit@oregon.uoregon.edu
2162 Kincaid, Eugene, OR 97405

Why aren't some of the roads I atlased highlighted?

We highlighted only the areas that atlasers told us they covered.

May I use some of the photographs found in the Atlas?

Some of the photographs are copyrighted. Please do not use or reproduce any photographs without permission from the photographer.

May I include one of the maps in a report or presentation?

Yes, with proper citation, which is:

Adamus, P.R., K. Larsen, G. Gillson, and C.R. Miller. 2001. Oregon Breeding Bird Atlas. Oregon Field Ornithologists, P.O. Box 10373, Eugene, OR 97440.

If you would like to use more than one map, first request permission from the authors.

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